Meet Brunnhilde Claux, the winemaker on a mission at Domaine de Courbissac

Meet Brunnhilde Claux, the winemaker on a mission at Domaine de Courbissac

When I arrive at the Domaine de Courbissac winery, perched halfway up a scrubby mountainside in the southern French region of Minervois, winemaker Brunnhilde Claux comes out to greet me, walking slowly and deliberately through the hot midday air. She is recovering from recent back surgery and I get the impression that – understandably –…
Markets Live: ASX set for subdued open, earnings deluge eyed

Markets Live: ASX set for subdued open, earnings deluge eyed

The Australian market is set for a subdued start as concerns around Turkey linger and investors eye earnings from a clutch of firms including NAB and Domino's.
AMP terminated former ‘puppet’ planner over compliance concerns

AMP terminated former ‘puppet’ planner over compliance concerns

The former AMP financial planner responsible for publicly airing damning allegations about high-pressure sales tactics at the company, resigned from the wealth manager under a cloud after it red-flagged some of his advice over compliance concerns. Brett Strong, a self-employed financial planner who became an authorised representative of AMP in mid-2013, told ABC TV's Four…
Apartments, houses up: New dwelling approvals rise more than expected in June

Apartments, houses up: New dwelling approvals rise more than expected in June

The housing construction industry shrugged off concerns about tighter credit in June, with new building approvals jumping a stronger-than-expected 6.4 per cent from May. New dwelling approvals picked up to 19,133 in June from 17,979 the previous month in seasonally adjusted terms, well ahead of the 1 per cent expected increase and driven by apartment…
Momentum builds to drop company tax cuts

Momentum builds to drop company tax cuts

Treasurer Scott Morrison has cautioned the Liberal Party against knee-jerk reactions to Saturday's byelection results while at the same time stopping short of pledging to take company tax cuts for big business to the next election if rejected by the Senate. There is now a growing view within the cabinet, as well as the backbench,…
Deloitte once again on the lookout for a head of tax

Deloitte once again on the lookout for a head of tax

Deloitte is on the hunt out for its fourth head of tax since 2012 with the incumbent lead of its tax practice, Dave Kennedy, to follow CEO Cindy Hook into an Asia Pacific role from September. His departure comes a little over a year since he was appointed to fix the firm's underperforming tax practice.…
Super delivers again, but what will ‘best in show’ deliver?

Super delivers again, but what will ‘best in show’ deliver?

For nearly a decade, the retirement savings of Australians have been swelling nicely, but the Productivity Commission is rewriting the rules of the game and this will affect costs and returns across the $2.6 trillion system. Results released this week show returns for superannuation funds with growth-orientated asset allocations, which is where the majority of…
SEEK’s growth strategy not deterred by write-downs

SEEK’s growth strategy not deterred by write-downs

Shareholders in global online job seeking business SEEK will have their faith in the company's "go-for-growth" strategy tested as chief executive Andrew Bassat increases investment in new ventures. SEEK is most likely facing broker downgrades following disclosures by the company on Monday. A majority of Australian analysts covering the stock already have 'sell' or 'reduce'…
Personality tests, games used to hire law grads

Personality tests, games used to hire law grads

When Herbert Smith Freehills introduced an occupational personality test as part of its clerkship recruitment about a decade ago, there was a bit of concern about departing from the industry standard of resumé, covering letter and academic transcripts. Now the rest of the industry is following suit, with most big law firms using a range…
Industry-led university research won’t solve skills shortage

Industry-led university research won’t solve skills shortage

Universities partnering with industry to create industry-specific PhD programs is the "worst possible" way to fix skills shortages in so-called "deep tech" areas, such bio tech and quantum computing, leading researchers say. Professor Michael Biercuk, director of the Quantum Control Laboratory at the University of Sydney, said there were already too many people with PhDs…

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