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Apple, Samsung to lose their stranglehold on phones in 2019

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Apple, Samsung to lose their stranglehold on phones in 2019

An analysis of visits to the mobile phone comparison site WhistleOut suggests that the trend may already have begun.

This quarter, interest in Google’s Pixel phones increased by about 500 per cent, compared to previous quarters, according to WhistleOut’s figures.

The level of interest in the Pixel 3, accounting for little more than 5 per cent of WhistleOut’s “share of voice” metric, which measures when consumers are actively interested in a phone, is still low compared to the interest in Apple’s and Samsung’s phones, but it’s sharply improved on Google’s traditional 1 per cent share of voice.

Carriers leading the charge

Interest in Huawei phones likewise improved fivefold over the same period, from hovering at 0.5 per cent or less, to 2.5 per cent this quarter.

The worm is turning: Google and Huawei are starting to get the attention of consumers. Not a lot. But some. 

The brands that for years struggled to make inroads into the Australian market, dominated like few other markets by Samsung and Apple, are suddenly starting to get traction with consumers.

“If this is the beginning of a trend,” says Joe Hanlon, publisher at WhistleOut, “then the trend isn’t that consumers are turning away from Apple and Samsung. It’s that the carriers are.

“The carriers are now willing to spend marketing dollars on other brands, they’re willing to range those products on their shelves, and consumers are following their lead.

“We could see this trend continue into next year, if the carriers are committed to ranging products from other than Apple and Samsung, and giving them prominence in their advertising and on their store shelves.”

Vodafone’s chief commercial officer, Ben McIntosh, told The Australian Financial Review that he does expect the trend to continue into next year.

“2019 is not going to be a disastrous year for Apple and Samsung. I think they’re going to continue to be very strong. But I do think that 2019 will not be the year when you can instantly write off those other brands like we have in the past.

“There’s a definite, big increase in interest [in other brands] now. What’s happened in the last six months is there has been a raft of very high-quality phones launched from all brands, including Apple and Samsung, and it’s certainly sparked a lot of interest. A lot of people are now looking at different types of phones.

“Australians are suddenly saying ‘why am I sticking to the same phone I’ve had for years? Let’s have a look at something new’.”

Big players not going away

Still, not everyone is convinced the Australian public is ready to end its love affair with Samsung and Apple.

The telecommunications analysis company Telsyte reckons that more than 90 per cent of Apple owners and more than 80 per cent of Samsung owners plan to repeat their purchase, meaning they would only ever release their grip on the market slowly, if at all.

“We anticipate the increasing market shares of emerging smartphone brands will more likely be taking shares from brands other than Apple and Samsung in 2019,” said Telsyte senior analyst Alvin Lee.

What does seem certain, though, is that 5G won’t play a big role in any changing of the guard in 2019.

Showing off a 5G handset from the Chinese phone maker ZTE last week, as well as a portable 5G hotspot from Taiwan’s HTC, Telstra officials said that it would still be several years until Australian customers got the full benefit of 5G technology in their phones.

The first generation of 5G phones, expected to appear in the first half of 2019, will all use a technology known as “5G Non Stand-Alone” (NSA), which relies on the existing 4G network to establish connections between two parties, before the data is transferred using a mix of the 4G and 5G networks.

Channa Seneviratne, Telstra network executive, said that meant 5G NSA phones wouldn’t get one of the main benefits of 5G: the ability to quickly establish data connections.

On pure 5G (or “5G Stand Alone”) phones, such latency is expected to be 1 millisecond or lower, dramatically improving the responsiveness of applications such as gaming and web browsing, even when the high data throughputs of 5G aren’t needed.

But 5G phones won’t appear until 2020 or 2021, Mr Seneviratne said, and in the meantime 5G NSA phones will have latency more like 4G phones, some 50 times higher than pure 5G. Telstra was working to get some of the latency advantages of 5G across to 5G NSA phones, but it was early days for those experiments.

“We think it’s going to be better than 4G, but not as good as 5G,” he told the Financial Review.

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Ronnie O’Sullivan: Steve Davis would ‘love’ to see Sports Personality nomination

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Ronnie O’Sullivan: Steve Davis would ‘love’ to see Sports Personality nomination
O’Sullivan wins record seventh UK title to make history – best shots

Record-breaking snooker player Ronnie O’Sullivan should be nominated for BBC Sports Personality of the Year, says six-time world champion Steve Davis.

O’Sullivan made history with a 19th win in a Triple Crown event as he took the UK Championship for the seventh time.

But the 43-year-old has never even made the shortlist for the BBC award.

“I would personally love to see Ronnie O’Sullivan nominated as one of the spots for Sports Personality of the Year,” said 1988 award winner Davis.

“I think it would put the cat among the pigeons with the British voters, and he would be astonished by how many people would vote for him.”

Sports Personality: Snooker legend Steve Davis wins in 1988

Englishman O’Sullivan, a five-time world champion, beat Northern Ireland’s Mark Allen 10-6 in Sunday’s final at the York Barbican.

Victory came 25 years after he won his first UK title and adds to his seven Masters victories.

This year’s Sports Personality show takes place at the Genting Arena in Birmingham on Sunday – and for the first time contenders will be revealed on the night of the show.

The public will decide via a phone and online vote who will follow 2017 winner Sir Mo Farah and walk away with the trophy.

Sign up to My Sport to follow snooker news on the BBC app.

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Babes in the Wood murders: Paedophile killer Russell Bishop found guilty of murdering Karen Hadaway and Nicola Fellows in 1986

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Babes in the Wood murders: Paedophile killer Russell Bishop found guilty of murdering Karen Hadaway and Nicola Fellows in 1986

Babes in the Wood killer Russell Bishop has been found guilty of the paedophile murder of nine-year-olds Karen Hadaway and Nicola Fellows, 31 years after being tried and acquitted of the crime.

The verdict of the Old Bailey jury brings to an end a tragic story that began when Bishop sexually assaulted, strangled and killed the girls in an ivy-covered den in Brighton’s Wild Park on 9 October 1986.

Bishop was swiftly arrested, but when the case came to trial at Lewes Crown Court in December 1987, it took a jury just two hours to clear him.  Less than three years later, he committed a horrific attack on a seven-year-old girl, snatching her off the street, bundling her into the boot of his car and driving her to a remote beauty spot before strangling, sexually assaulting her and leaving her for dead.

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The girl, however, survived to become what one former detective called “an exceptional witness”, who was instrumental in Bishop being convicted and given a life sentence for the 1990 attack.

The fact Bishop was freed to strike again has helped ensure that the Babes in the Wood murders have, as Detective Superintendent Jeff Riley leader of the cold case investigation admitted, “hung like a cloud over Brighton” for three decades.

Sussex Police faced repeated claims that they had somehow bungled the original murder investigation, with particular focus on how they and scientific experts handled forensic evidence.

Karen Hadaway (left) and Nicola Fellows were sexually assaulted and murdered in a Brighton park in October 1986 (PA)

The bereaved families, meanwhile, never once gave up in their quest for justice for their children.

Karen’s mother Michelle Hadaway, 61, attended every day of both the 1987 and the 2018 trials, and was in court to watch Bishop finally be convicted of killing her daughter, after advances in DNA profiling allowed forensic scientists to link him to the crime with a one-in-a-billion chance of error.

Ms Hadaway’s former husband Lee, however, never lived to see his daughter’s killer convicted of murder.

After weeping in court when Bishop was cleared in 1987, he suffered a fatal heart attack aged 50 in 1998. His family described him as a father who died of a broken heart.

Nicola’s father Barrie Fellows, on the other hand, faced an unfounded 30-year whispering campaign that he was the real killer.

Bishop seized upon this, instructing his Old Bailey defence team to accuse Mr Fellows of murdering his own daughter. Out of court, speaking on behalf of Sussex Police, Mr Riley condemned this as “cruel and desperate measures from a desperate man”.

Barrie Fellows arriving to give evidence at the Old Bailey (PA)

It meant that Mr Fellows, 69, entered the witness box to face a barrage of what the prosecution called “unsubstantiated salacious allegations” that he had watched his own daughter being molested in a child sex abuse video.

Mr Fellows was pushed close to tears as he denied involvement in his own daughter’s death.

His denials were fully corroborated by the evidence of a pathologist who said the postmortem records showed there was no evidence Nicola had been abused in the months before her murder.

Brian Altman QC, prosecuting, accused Bishop of scraping the barrel and seeking to drag Mr Fellows’ name through the mud in order to “create a smokescreen in the hope that, quite literally, he would get away with murder twice.”

Questions remain about the timeline presented to the jury in the 1987 trial and whether it might have assisted the defence.

Tapings taken from the forearm of Karen Hadaway in 1986 became a ‘time capsule’ that provided ‘devastating’ proof of Russell Bishop’s guilt, the Old Bailey heard (Sussex Police/PA)

But after all the criticism of Sussex Police, it was the forensic evidence they helped collect in 1986 that finally convicted Bishop in what is the thought to be the oldest UK case to have ended in a successful double jeopardy prosecution.

An independent expert reviewed every step in the 32-year history of the handling of the exhibits, and concluded there was no realistic possibility of the forensic integrity of the evidence presented in court having been compromised by cross-contamination.

This allowed Mr Altman to present the samples collected in 1986 as being so carefully preserved as to be “a time capsule” providing “devastating” proof of Bishop’s guilt.

The Old Bailey jury was told that in 2014 samples taken from Karen’s left forearm in 1986 were re-examined in the hope of finding traces of DNA. 

This yielded skin flakes which were subjected to ultra-modern profiling techniques to produce a result that was one billion times more likely if Bishop’s DNA were present than if it was absent.

The police were convinced that this Pinto-branded sweatshirt, discarded on the night of the murders, contained forensic proof that Bishop was the killer (Sussex Police/PA)

Modern DNA techniques were also used to prove what the prosecution had said all along: that a paint-spattered light blue Pinto-branded sweatshirt found discarded on the night of the murder was what Bishop had been wearing when he killed the girls.

In 1987, when DNA profiling was in its infancy, the prosecution had to rely on analysis of paint stains, clothing fibres and plant material to present a case that the sweatshirt was linked to Bishop, to the ivy-covered murder scene and to the dead girls.

In 1987 the defence had seemingly been successful in casting doubt on this forensic evidence.

In 2018, however, the prosecution could present the Old Bailey with modern DNA analysis of 1986 samples from the sweatshirt that had uncovered a profile which would be “in excess of one billion times more likely if DNA was present from the defendant”.

Independent reviews of the paint, plant and fibre forensics also backed the 1987 findings that the sweatshirt was linked to Bishop, the murder scene and the girls.

Effectively, DNA had turned up new evidence linking Bishop directly to the body of Karen Hadaway, and provided heavy reinforcement for the claim he had been wearing the Pinto sweatshirt when he ended the lives of two little girls. 

His lawyer tried to suggest the “time capsule” was contaminated and “leaky”, but the court never got to hear Bishop himself attempt a detailed explanation of the DNA evidence. 

He effectively fled from his accusers before that could happen, waiting until the jurors had filed out for their lunch break before telling judge Mr Justice Sweeney he did not wish to face any more of Mr Altman’s cross-examination.

Russell Bishop at the Old Bailey: he refused to continue giving evidence after being confronted with grooming letters he had written to a 13-year-old girl (Elizabeth Cook/PA)

Bishop, it seemed, could not handle being confronted with the grooming letters he sent to a 13-year-old girl in 1987 – while on remand awaiting trial for the Babes in the Wood murders – and being repeatedly told: “You have a sexual interest in children.  You are a paedophile.”

He expressed shame for the attack on the seven-year-old girl, but perhaps with an eye on his own ego as well as escaping justice for the murders of Karen and Nicola, he repeatedly denied he was a paedophile.

And so the Old Bailey witnessed the unusual spectacle of a defendant admitting he had violated a seven-year-old child “to belittle and shame her” – because at least that way Bishop could avoid confessing his true sexual urges.

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Bishop who, the court heard, had expressed concern for his parole chances but not his seven-year-old victim, also admitted he had lied throughout his 1990 trial. 

The jurors clearly decided he had lied for three decades about the Babes in the Wood killings, and carried on lying while inside court number 16 of the Old Bailey.

It took two hours for a jury to acquit Bishop in 1987.  It took the 2018 jury just two and a half hours to deliver a unanimous verdict.  They found him guilty of murdering Karen Hadaway and guilty of murdering Nicola Fellows.

“We will never know what kind of artful deception he practised to persuade those two little girls to go with him,” said Mr Altman, the prosecutor, “But persuade them he did. 

“Those girls were blindly led to their deaths in a den from which they never emerged alive.”

After 32 years of denials that began the moment he was arrested, Russell Bishop was finally exposed as the murdering paedophile he is.

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UK government delays Parliament’s vote on Brexit

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UK government delays Parliament’s vote on Brexit

An Anti-Brexit campaigner Steve Bray (R) stands with placards  and a pro-Brexit supporter (L) stands with a placard demanding an immediate departure from the European Union.










DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS | AFP | Getty Images

An Anti-Brexit campaigner Steve Bray (R) stands with placards  and a pro-Brexit supporter (L) stands with a placard demanding an immediate departure from the European Union.

A Brexit vote in U.K. parliament has been delayed by Prime Minister Theresa May, following fears that the British government was headed for an embarrassing defeat.

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Advent calendar 2018: Williams wows crowd with ‘fluke shot’ and naked presser – BBC Sport

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Advent calendar 2018: Williams wows crowd with ‘fluke shot’ and naked presser – BBC Sport

Mark Williams wows The Crucible crowds with a stunning ‘fluke’ shot and by keeping to his promise of arriving to his press conference naked.
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Crossrail to be delayed indefinitely as crisis-hit London rail project needs extra £1.7bn in funding

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Crossrail to be delayed indefinitely as crisis-hit London rail project needs extra £1.7bn in funding

The opening of London‘s crisis-hit Crossrail has been delayed indefinitely while an additional £1.7bn may be needed to complete the project, transport bosses have said.

The capital’s flagship east-west Elizabeth Line underground rail link had been due to open this month but was pushed back to Autumn 2019 after delays were announced over the summer.

However Transport for London (TfL) officials have now scrapped that proposal, saying it had “become clear that more work is required than had been envisaged”.

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It is unclear when the first paying passengers will begin using the line, which stretches from Reading and Heathrow Airport in the west to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east.

The scheme requires further funding of between £1.3bn and £1.7bn, bringing the total expected cost of the scheme to £17.6bn, following a £590m cash injection in July.

The project has suffered from widespread delays including the testing of new tracks, with stations and the fit out of the tunnels at “varying stages of completion”.

Last week the project was thrown into further turmoil with the resignation of its chairman, Sir Terry Morgan.

Announcing the delay, Crossrail’s new chief executive, Mark Wild, said there was “a huge amount still to do” and that he was therefore unable to “commit to an autumn 2019 opening date”.

He added: “My team and I are working to establish a robust and deliverable schedule in order to give Londoners a credible plan to open the railway and provide a safe and reliable service. Once that work is completed we will then be in a position to confirm a new opening date.”

Warning signs stand on newly laid railway track in a tunnel of the Crossrail project in Stepney, east London (Reuters)

The Mayor of London, the Greater London Authority (GLA), and TfL said a financing package had been agreed with the government to open the Elizabeth line “as quickly as possible”.

A review by auditors KPMG found the cost of the delay could hit £2bn.

To reach this figure, up to £1.3bn will be handed over in the form of a loan from central government, alongside £100m funding from the GLA.

An additional £750m will be made available as a loan from the Department of Transport as a contingency, pushing the total funding package above £2bn.

This deal will replace the need for a £350m loan announced in October.

Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London, said: “I haven’t hidden my anger and frustration about the Crossrail project being delayed. This has a knock-on consequence of significant additional cost to the project. 

“It has been increasingly clear that the previous Crossrail Ltd leadership painted a far too optimistic picture of the project’s status.” 

Mike Brown, London’s Transport Commissioner, called the delay “extremely disappointing” and warned the scale of the work to be completed was only now becoming clear.

When fully open, the Elizabeth line will increase central London’s rail capacity by 10 per cent, carrying over half a million passengers per day.

Mr Khan said his priority remained “getting this monumental project completed as soon as possible”.

The mayor has ordered the release of all Crossrail Board minutes over the last five years in a bid to provide transparency of the process and has written to the National Audit Office confirming his full support of its planned investigation into the project.

Rail minister Andrew Jones said he was committed to the “rapid completion of the project, in a way that is fair to UK taxpayers, and that enables London – as the primary beneficiary of Crossrail – to bear the additional costs”.

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Popular apps like WeatherBug and GasBuddy are tracking your location with incredible detail, report says

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Popular apps like WeatherBug and GasBuddy are tracking your location with incredible detail, report says

Popular smartphone apps like WeatherBug, The Weather Channel and GasBuddy are tracking users’ locations with extreme detail, collecting specific street addresses and extensive trip profiles, according to a new investigation by The New York Times.

full investigation, and how The New York Times put it together.

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ACCC finally challenges Mike Baird’s $6.75b port privatisation

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ACCC finally challenges Mike Baird’s $6.75b port privatisation

Through the Port Botany auction process, the state government was persuaded by one of the leading bidders to beef up the reassurances that Sydney’s Port Botany hub would retain its near exclusive grip on container traffic in an out of NSW.

Sources close to the 2013 auction process have told The Australian Financial Review that the government’s sale team was offered – and ultimately accepted – advice from a bidding consortium that included The Infrastructure Fund on the best way to secure Port Botany’s container business and thus earn the best possible price in the auction.

Restricting Newcastle port

The pathway to value enhancement, which the ACCC has alleged is an illegal constraint on competition, was to embed thresholds on the volume of containers that potential competition, the Port of Newcastle (PoN), might handle.

The ceiling was put at a cynically low 30,000 TEUs (20-foot units) that was adjusted by an equally miserable annual growth rate. Shattering that ceiling would trigger compensation payments that would be made to the state government and then go directly to NSW Ports. That compensation would be equivalent to the wharfage fee that Port Botany might have earned it the boxes had gone through their port. It has been estimated that this would amount to about $100 a unit.

A pair of 99-year leases for Port Botany and Port Kembla were sold for $5.07 billion to a consortium called NSW Ports in early 2013 and then, a year later, the Port of Newcastle was acquired for $1.75 billion by a joint venture made up of The Infrastructure Fund and China Merchants. Peter Braig

There are at least two layers of commercial irony in this.

First, The Infrastructure Fund consortium ultimately lost out to NSW Ports and, instead, then successfully involved itself in the bid-off for PoN. It is the world’s biggest coal port and the sole target of constraints in container competition that the ACCC now asserts are illegal.

And second, the ACCC and the PoN haven’t always sat in alignment just what competition might be. It might be recalled that one of the first things that the new owners of the coal port did was to attempt to drive revenues by lifting shipping channel access fees.

With some little encouragement from the ACCC, the major user of that channel, Glencore, immediately launched action to have the channel declared and its pricing regulated by the competition regulator. And, after an early loss or two, Glencore prevailed and the ACCC is now the price arbiter for the channel.

That has not been the end of that matter, mind you.

The PoN has returned to the National Competition Council (NCC) seeking revocation of the declaration of those orders. That case is founded largely on the fact that the NCC was the original point of victory for the port’s owners. The council refused Glencore’s declaration application. But that ruling was subsequently overturned by the often more rational Australian Competition Council.

From what we hear a decision from the NCC is expected within weeks.

Meanwhile, as that stoush played out, PoN management was moved to revitalise plans that date back 20 years that would pave the way for construction of a full-service container terminal at the port.

Now, you might find it rather odd that these savvy new owners might invest time and capital on fleshing out a proposal whose economics they knew would be smashed by cap and compensation schemes written into the privatisation deeds. But ultimately, this decision was seminal in the ACCC’s ability to release the legal hounds.

From the get go in 2013, the ACCC was fully aware of the anti-competitive implications of the privatisation deeds. But the regulator lacked any evidence that supported the potential that competition was being substantially lessened.

That was because the PoN had shown no obvious interest in expanding its container business that has average 10,000 TEUs a year over the past half a decade. Whether by plan or happy accident, that all changed when the port’s new owners publicly offered containers as a diversification option.

Things really changed when PoN’s initial musings translated two years ago into an understanding with currently Australia’s biggest container stevedore operator, DP World. That deal offered DP World a period of exclusivity that justified the stevedore’s study of the potential of a facility big enough to receive 400,000 TEUs annually.

PoN walked away from that deal in September but management is still working on a plan to invest more than $500 million on a terminal capable of receiving the new breed of very big container vessels that can carry 20,000 TEUs.

It’s not me, it’s you

“We were onto this straight away,” ACCC chairman Rod Sims told the Financial Review on Monday. “People might ask, ‘well, why didn’t you stop it and why didn’t you get involved earlier. But we are required to argue the purpose and effects of what we saw. The problem was that the Port of Newcastle showed no desire to build a terminal. As soon as it became clear they were serious, then we were right back into it.

“We want to send messages to everyone that they ought not to be involved in these sorts of deals. We will pursue these matters and that can be targeted at the new owners and that can be advisers to businesses as well. We haven’t taken action against them here, but we could.

“If you privatise in inefficient or illegal ways, don’t come and tell me that I am the problem. You’re the problem. You have lost focus on what should be the motivation to release state assets. So you’re the problem.

“Let’s get back to what privatisation is meant be about,” Sims continued. “The whole argument is supposed to be economic efficiency. And what do we have here? The opposite.”

As you might expect, the target of the ACCC’s ire is unimpressed by the attempted intervention and talking tough about defending the once secret mechanic that so effectively ring-fences its container monopoly.

NSW Ports said the deeds operated in “the best interests of all stakeholders, the economy and people of NSW” and vowed to mount a “vigorous” defence of the ACCC proceedings.

“The success of Port Botany and Port Kembla is in the national interest,” the NSW Port’s statement concluded.

Now, it must be comforting to be so certain that your enrichment and the national interest are one and the same. But the ACCC is pretty determined to test whether that concert of interests is as firm as NSW Ports might want to believe. And, frankly, the standing of the ACCC case looks pretty straightforward to simple folk like me. For whatever reason, the deeds act to constrain competition.

Whether that is done in a legal way or not is for a court to decide. But it is hard to believe that vigorous defence is the only option here for NSW Ports. I mean, a loss here would see the deeds made dust and protections deemed important to the 2013 asset valuations disappear without compensation. The ACCC is also seeking pecuniary penalties and costs.

So sure, puff up publicly. But maybe NSW Ports might do well also to play a more conciliatory hand with a state government that has already indulged negotiations with PoN management over the termination of the cap and compensation protections. The balance of risk here is delicate. NSW Ports could sit back and win, it could negotiate and avoid a loss or it could fight for its life and end up with nothing.

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Goldman Sachs reduces its outlook for Fed rate hikes but thinks the market is still wrong

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Goldman Sachs reduces its outlook for Fed rate hikes but thinks the market is still wrong

“December is still very likely (in our view 90%). However, we think the probability of a move in March has now fallen to slightly below 50%,” he added.

Until the change, Hatzius had the most aggressive Fed call on Wall Street, with four quarter-point increases likely in 2019. That was even more hawkish than the current forecast of three hikes from officials on the Federal Open Market Committee, which sets rates for the central bank.

Markets, though, have slashed their expectations following the stock market turmoil over the past two months that has coupled with an intensified trade skirmish between the U.S. and China and expectations that global growth will slow in the year ahead.

The market now is pricing a 73 percent chance of a December hike, but only a 48 percent probability that the Fed hikes rates at all in 2019, according to the CME’s tracker. Looking further out, futures contracts indicate a growing possibility of a rate cut heading into late 2020 and early 2021. The fed funds rate is currently in a range of 2 percent to 2.25 percent.

Goldman thinks investors are overly concerned about how tight financial conditions will get.

“In our forecast, the economy continues to grow above trend for most of the year, the unemployment rate falls further below the Fed’s estimate of its longer-term level, wage and price inflation gradually move higher, and we see a return to quarterly hikes in June that last through the end of 2019,” Hatzius said.

He discounts the likelihood of a recession anytime soon as financial imbalances and economic overheating do not appear present. The employment picture remains strong and inflation is likely to pick up, he said.

“We therefore think that the storm will pass and this will keep Fed officials on a normalization path, albeit a more tortuous one than up to now,” Hatzius wrote.

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Sterling plummets on reports UK government could pull Parliament’s vote on Brexit

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Sterling plummets on reports UK government could pull Parliament’s vote on Brexit

Prime Minister Theresa May leaving 10 Downing Street, London, ahead of Prime Minister's Questions. 










Victoria Jones – PA Images | PA Images | Getty Images

Prime Minister Theresa May leaving 10 Downing Street, London, ahead of Prime Minister’s Questions. 

Reports that Tuesday’s Brexit vote in the U.K. parliament has been delayed by Prime Minister Theresa May has sent sterling reeling.

Tweet 1

That assertion was supported by the BBC’s political editor who said she had heard that the vote would likely not happen on Tuesday.

However in a phone call to CNBC, a press officer to 10 Downing Street said the vote was still on track for Tuesday night.

“The spokesperson gave a briefing not long ago to say that the vote is going ahead tomorrow as planned, there is nothing else to add at this stage.”

Members of the U.K.’s main opposition Labour Party have reportedly said that May will now provide an update on Brexit to the House of Commons on Monday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. London time.

The official Twitter feed of the Leader of the House of Commons, Andrea Leadsom, has confirmed that there will be three government statements in the House of Commons today, including one from Theresa May.

Any delay would be seen as an attempt by the government to return to the negotiating table with the European Union and seek terms more amenable to U.K. lawmakers.

The climb-down will be seen as a failure on the government’s part to persuade enough lawmakers that the draft Brexit deal with Brussels is the best possible arrangement.

The leader of the U.K.’s main opposition Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, has reportedly claimed that delaying the vote would show that Britain “doesn’t have a functioning government.”

And the head of the U.K.’s third biggest party, the Scottish National Party, has taken to Twitter to accuse Theresa May of “pathetic cowardice” should she implement any delay.

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